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Officer Ego

K-9 Ego

Breed: Belgian Malinois

DOB: August 13, 2013

Color: Mahogany with a Black Mask

(K9 Unit team member since 2015)

K-9 Ego is certified through NAPWADA in narcotics and patrol. Ego loves to work. He enjoys locating narcotics and other illegal items. He gets so excited when it’s time to track down a bad guy. Ego is very dedicated to serving the citizens of California, and very thankful to patrol its streets.

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q. What kind of dog is standard for Police Work?
We use Belgian Malinois, Dutch Shepherds, and German Shepherds.

Q. Do the dogs live with their handlers?
Yes. The K-9 handler is responsible for the care of the dog. K-9 Ego lives at home with his handler and has his own bedroom.

Q. How old are the dogs when they start training?
Dogs are carefully screened and tested before they begin training. The dogs need to have the appropriate drive for Police work. They must also be environmentally sound and mature to deal with the pressures of training. We also want the dog to be fully developed so we can get a good x-ray of the hips and elbows. Each dog is a case by case basis. K-9 Ego was 13 months old when he started training.

Q. How old are the dogs when they retire?
We do not retire a dog based upon a certain age. It depends on their health, but generally a Police Dog retires around 8 or 9 years old.

Q.Where do they go when they retire?
The dogs live out the remainder of their lives with the handlers with whom they worked their career.

Q.How long are the dogs trained?
The K-9 team completes a 400-hour basic patrol and detection course. Follow by weekly maintenance training.

Q.Where does the department get their dogs from?
We get our dogs from a K-9 vendor who imports them from Europe.

Q.How much do the dogs cost?
A dog usually costs between $3500 to $6000. This may seem like a lot but the dog will usually pay for itself within the first six months on the street after training.

.Q.How is a dog able to smell so well?
A number of things contribute to the dog's keen sense of smell. Their long snouts have a large turbinate bone structure that holds millions of scent receptor cells, plus the olfactory lobe of their brain is much larger than that of a human being.

Q.Is hurting a Police Dog the same as hurting a Police Officer? 

PA Title 18 § 5511.2.  Police animals.

               (a)  Illegal to taunt police animals.--It shall be unlawful for any person to willfully or maliciously taunt, torment, tease, beat, kick or strike a police animal. Any person who violates any of the provisions of this subsection commits a felony of the third degree.

               (b)  Illegal to torture police animals.--It shall be unlawful for any person to willfully or maliciously torture, mutilate, injure, disable, poison or kill a police animal. Any person who violates any of the provisions of this subsection commits a felony of the third degree.